3 Quote Challenge. Day 3

jim-morrison-149809_640

Today’s quote, from Jim Morrison, is on the subject of poetry.

If my poetry aims to achieve anything, it’s to deliver people from the limited ways in which they see and feel.

Jim Morrison

I’m grateful to Fimnora at Quantum Hermit for inviting me to take part in this 3 quote challenge.

For the challenge, the rules are:
I – Post your favorite quotes or your own quotes for three (3) posts in a row.
II – Thank the person who nominated you.
III – Pass it on to three (3) other bloggers per quote, each time you post them.
IIIb – Or pass it to nine (9) bloggers if you choose to post all the quotes together, in the same post.

These are the three bloggers who I’m inviting to run with the torch today:

http://dancingechoes.com/

https://justinmywritemind.wordpress.com/

https://yzhengblog.wordpress.com/

© Jane Paterson Basil

Advertisements

26 thoughts on “3 Quote Challenge. Day 3

  1. Blimey, he didn’t expect much from himself, did he? It’s a sort of ‘Doors of perception’ idea, I suppose. What must it be like to be so ambitious? I just hope to entertain in some meagre fashion 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. He did have a massive ego.
      I chose the quote because it was it was the nearest thing I could find to what I wanted to say. I write poetry because I have to, but I share it because I’ve realised that it’s the best tool I have for getting my ideas, thoughts, feelings, emotions or whatever across to people, and by doing so I hope that they feel more compassion and manage more laughter. A combination of compassion and laughter could snowball into something with the power to bring about positive change, even if it only occurs in small pockets.

      Liked by 1 person

            1. What, even if you’re writing a novel? That nearly drove me crazy. I thought there was an unwritten law that said you couldn’t be a writer unless you wrote a novel. It was a huge relief to find I was mistaken.

              Liked by 1 person

              1. Absolutely – you are most definitely a writer, novel or not! I’m hoping the short story and poetry markets will grow and grow, as we all have such short attention spans now. Of course, along with that comes the fact that most people expect to read for nothing, which makes it tricky to earn any money at it. Sounds materialistic, but I’d love to earn a little, just so I can have an excuse to spend more time writing!

                Liked by 1 person

                  1. Very difficult to put yourself out there – I’m pretty rubbish at it, though improving slowly. I am trying to enter more competitions now, I put myself up for the WoMentoring scheme etc. It’s a terribly slow process and every knock back very hurtful – especially if you receive several close together, or the same day as I have a few times! What can you do except get up and have another go? We’re good enough – let’s just do it 🙂

                    Liked by 1 person

                    1. We’re better than a lot, but lets not forget that mediocrity rules.
                      About four years ago I woke up in the middle of the night with a full-blown children’s story about an autistic boy whose life is changed by his involvement with a spider that lives in the wardrobe. Until this time I had never seriously considered trying to get published, but i knew that this story was good. While i was working on it – trying to do the illustrations, because i knew exactly how i wanted them, my daughter bought me a couple of books on writing children’s stories, and i learnt that it’s the most dificult genre to get published. And yet have you seen some of the junk that’s out there sitting right to all those masterpieces? I loved my little autistic child – even wept for him sometimes. But now he’s gathering dust in one of my filing boxes.
                      You’ve got more guts than me. And I don’t get it – your work is both intelligent and accessible. Maybe you should try pretentious intellectualism or moronic instead. But where’s the fun in that?

                      Liked by 1 person

                    2. Oh, I love the sound of your story – what a great idea. I have an illustrator friend who’s spent probably the last seven years developing a children’s story book – your story sounds much stronger and the subject matter (difference/ understanding diversity) is one that publishers are very keen on these days. Yes, it’s tough to be a new voice in that market, but people do break in. I’ve printed out and kept in my laptop bag a quote I found by Anne Rice.

                      ‘One of the great myths about being a writer is that it’s almost impossible to break in. That is simply not true. Every year people break in and they always have, or we wouldn’t have all these writers.’

                      I know I’ve seen a few new picture book publishers start up over the last few years, looking for new talent. If I can find the details, I’ll send them to you. Do keep trying – you’ve got a lot of talent and it’s not only the E.L Jameses of the world that get deals! x

                      Liked by 1 person

                    3. It would be great if you could find them. The only thing is that I scrapped my efforts at illustrating when I learned that a picture book by an unknown author is less likely to find a publisher than if it is offered without illustrations. Publishers like to choose their own illustrators, and these days I’m too out of practice to illustrate a book.
                      I have another three children’s books – two humorous and one soppy. But it’s Harry the Spider that matters to me. That’s not the title of the book, just my pet name for it. Lots of things get called Harry the Spider around here.

                      Liked by 1 person

                    4. Hi Jane, found a few contacts that might be worth a look.
                      *’Fat Fox’ who publish anything from picture books to YA.
                      Email: submissions@fatfoxbooks.com
                      Website: http://www.fatfoxbooks.com
                      *’Wacky Bee Books’ who pub for 5-12 year olds.
                      Email: submissions@wackybeebooks.com
                      Website: http://www.wackybeebooks.com
                      *’Dinosaur Books’ 6-12 years.
                      Email: submissions@dinosaurbooks.co.uk
                      Website: http://www.dinosaurbooks.co.uk

                      Not sure of their submission requirements but I’m sure they’ll be on their websites. Do you get Writing Magazine? That’s where I found all of these contacts. It has a really useful section of new publishers and writing competitions, though of course, it costs. These things come up reasonably regularly, so if I find any more, I’ll pass them on to you.
                      I heard that about writers and illustrators too, though surely, if your writing and your pictures are good, it shouldn’t be a hindrance. Best of luck with it all X

                      Liked by 1 person

                    5. You’re amazing! Thank you so much for this info. I should, but don’t, get Writing Magazine. I’m incredibly broke, which doesn’t matter much to me. Maybe if I cared more about money I would have made more effort to get published. That’s probably my real problem. But I really will try to get my act together as soon as my bedroom is sorted out – it’s going to be my office too, so I’ll be able to unpack everything.

                      Liked by 1 person

                    6. Very good luck with it all, Jane. I cheat with the mag and get hubby to by me a subscription for my birthday or Christmas! I will keep an eye out for any more opportunities. X

                      Liked by 1 person

                    7. We live and learn – and get burned sometimes along the way. I wouldn’t bother with another man if I lost this one. Men are odd, disturbing, scary creatures sometimes and I don’t blame you for going it alone. As long as you have plenty of friends and your own joy – your writing – then why bother.

                      Liked by 1 person

  2. My response to that was, “Wow, they weren’t just shaggy-haired kids after all! They really had brains.” Then I had to stop and think, well yeah, dum-dum. YOU were part of that generation! I think we’d be amazed if we knew the kinds of education these singers and actors have. Interesting quote…

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s