The crone’s imperial station

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I will embrace my advancing maturity
with shoulders back and head straight
I will cease clinging to the dried
and crisped shell of distant youth

I will exit the nursery, the students digs,
the disco, the music festival
to finally ease into a more fitting place
which will become my home

like a dierama or a riverside willow
I will sweep gracefully, accepting and
assisted by the wind’s embrace
I will erase the imagined shame
of the crone’s imperial station

©Jane Paterson Basil

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13 thoughts on “The crone’s imperial station

      1. I am in a sea change and hopefully I will stop letting my days slip from my grasp. I live by your words but I still dream of a facelift, no reason for a crone not to get tucked. Just install little rollers behind my ears and I’ll tighten them every so often.

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        1. The easiest method is to tie the hair back really tightly, or if you want to keep it down, carefully positioned duct tape does a pretty good job. You may have to add heavy foundation to conceal it. It works for me, as I can vary the look from day to day. Sometimes it pays to look old. For example, when I’m tightly taped and being hit on by a weirdo, I just quickly rip the stuff off, and hey presto! No need to cut his throat and chuck the body down a mineshaft.

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  1. Jane – firstly, this is a wonderful piece, but secondly the last comment you made on ‘You Are My Sunshine’ with a link to a poem you wrote has disappeared. Could you possibly re-post it for me?

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  2. Love this – embrace the crone, I say. Although, of course, I still have in my mind’s eye that I look as I did when I was 25, so in that way, I’ll never grow older. I’ve found myself surprised recently, seeing couples with young kids, or pregnant women, realising that being menopausal, I’m past that stage in my life now. Weird that it’s still a surprise. But part of me is proud of being an older bird – we wear our historys on our faces and there’s no shame in having lived a life

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    1. I agree. I’ve seen so many young people die. We should be grateful to have got this far. If any one of them have lived they may have started complaining about their age once they reached 40 or 50, never thinking about the alternative.
      I found it weird about three years ago when my daughter and I were about to enter our home when a really attractive guy came up to us. He said he used to live in that house, and he’d come back just to look at the facade, and remember. The thing I found odd was that he was talking to Laura, not me. Many years ago, if I was with a group of other girls, and a man approached us, he always made a beeline for me unless my friend Gaye was there. She was the most beautiful woman on the planet, and still is. This is her. https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=Gaye+Advert&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0CAcQ_AUoAWoVChMIxoT3nMKAxwIVKCjbCh3eagPY&biw=1093&bih=506
      I had forgotten that I was no longer 17! Ofcourse he talked to Laura rather than me. She looked lovely three years ago.

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      1. I had a best friend who always got the attention – sometimes I loved being able to send her in a frontal attack with men, sometimes I resented the attention she got. No pleasing some people.
        I always forget how old I am until I need to run up and down stairs all day at work 🙂

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