Melon Baller

By Paul, Guest poet

Melon baller, melon baller, your purpose is clear
Your life will be easy, you’ve no need to fear.
The mission is simple, much like your life
My insane yet mundane melon-balling device.

You appear to be dreary, grey and so bleak;
so tacky, exactly, and built to be weak.
You live such a cheap, meagre existance;
you’re replaced when you break, for not more than a sixpence.

So what do you do when no melon’s in sight?
You’re aching and shaking, no chance for delight.
The cravings grow strong, and so does the hate
The drought must end now, so I can partake.

I don’t play pool, paint, or go fishing
For balling fruit is my solitary mission
I ball to make the day more bright,
I ball to fill the lonely nights.

My son Paul wrote this while in prison. He was given three weeks solitary confinement for brewing hooch, and had to find ways to fill his time, and stop him from going crazy. He told me that at the point when he wrote this poem he felt as if he was losing his mind.

Being in lock up may make a person crazy, but so does drinking hooch. fortunately he had the opportunity to ponder that thought, and when he saw – through his barred windows –  a hooched-up inmate violently attack another prisoner he felt responsible and realized that selling hooch in prison  is a dangerous crime, even if it is the most carefully made hooch anyone has ever drunk…

 

 

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38 thoughts on “Melon Baller

  1. Did he have pencil and paper, Jane, or did he have to commit the poem to memory as he wrote it? Unbelievable what the mind rests on when it has no other stimulus other than itself. A melon baller! Most unlikely subject for a poem. Love it.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. He wrote it on the wall, in blood!
      Sorry, I couldn’t resist! He had pens, paper and a book about Jesus. I think that was about all. He read the book about Jesus, and was almost converted. Perhaps he could have done with another week…
      Actually I think his solitary confinement was for four weeks, not three – it seemed like ages to me. I was counting the days
      Thank you Judy, I’ll convey the message to him.

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      1. You are sooooooo bad! At any rate, what a positive response to a horrible situation! I often have thought that was what I’d have to do if I was ever put in solitary. Perhaps it would improve my memory if I had to do it without pen and paper!

        Liked by 1 person

        1. If I didn’t have pen and paper I’d probably end up thinking I was a walrus, or a cardboard box, or something – I have a terrible memory – maybe I’d cope by working out difficult math problems in my head.
          With some means of writing I don’t think I’d have that much trouble.

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  2. A really interesting poem. I like that he used a really specific object to talk about purpose. Sometimes I wish I was made and imbued with such a specific job description; it would make things a lot simpler. But this poem points out the flaws to that as well…

    It’s cool that your son inherited some writing talent!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. My poor, troubled, genius son inherited every talent that anybody in my family has, and some they don’t. Unfortunately he also inherited all our flaws – addiction from my mother’s side, autism from my father’s side, and some worrying stuff from his own dad.
      He wrote a few poems while he was in prison – some of them were, sort of, um, well, shall we say, not suitable for my blog – but they were all funny. The unrepeatable ones were hilarious…

      Liked by 2 people

        1. He made the best of a bad situation. He’s good at making friends, and he often disperses risky situations with humour – he also put himself in danger more than once by making the wrong jokes to the wrong people.

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  3. Another poet in the family! It makes it all the more interesting when you know the background story to it. Wow, writing it in blood!! That’s heavy duty. Do you know why he chose to do that? The bloodletting I mean. Was it of some significance? BTW, check out
    my post -http://soulgifts.com.au/2016/01/03/im-hungry/?c=2431#comment-2431 . You might find it interesting X

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Interesting he chose a melon baller – such an idiosyncratic thing to choose. But that’s the point, I guess – it really has no other purpose. I’d love to read some of his more risque poems – seems like you both have a talent for humour 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I suspect that ‘balls’ was the word which inspired him to write the poem. He’s always had a love of rude words – which reminds me of something we did when he was about seven. I most post the story…
      Paul doesn’t have any poems which can be described as risque – they are absolutely filthy, disgusting, totally non-PC smut which has me in fits of laughter. There’s one in particular – written for my nineteen year old grandson – which is one of the most revolting, and funny, things I have ever read. I wish I could, but there’s no way I can share them on WP!

      Liked by 1 person

        1. Wouldn’t that be great – until someone put a letter-bomb through his door, for being so offensive…
          seriously though, I’m going to talk to him about it. It could be a destraction, at least…
          Thanks for suggesting it, although I’m noy sure whether you were serious.

          Liked by 1 person

                    1. Ah, dear. I’ve often thought humans need an ‘off’ switch – for our own sake as well as for others. Some nights, i’d just love to be able to power down – put myself on standby instead of going through the fuss of relaxing, getting my mind into the right state for sleep.
                      Sorry, not to suggest that you’d want to turn him off – my mind was just drifting 🙂

                      Liked by 1 person

                    2. I did want to turn him off, because as long as he was talking I couldn’t get on with anything. I love (some of) our conversations, but sometimes I need to work.
                      Do you conscioiusly prepare yourself for sleep? I just read a book until I can no longer keep my eyes open, but it doesn’t matter what time I go to sleep, because most days I can get up whenever I like, and when I have to get up early I make do with less sleep. I doesn’t seem to make any difference – with or without sleep, my energy levels are equally low…

                      Liked by 1 person

                    3. I have had to prepare myself for sleep sometimes in recent years. I’ve been very anxious and sleepless at times -bed has been a draw and a place of torture too, linked with ideas of exhaustion and fretfulness. I’m gradually getting over it now, thank goodness.

                      Liked by 1 person

                    4. Ah – the inability to unwind, and close off those worrying thoughts rattling around in your head. I used to suffer from that, but I found a cure: Sleeping alone.
                      I’m glad it’s getting easier for you, because my cure may not suit someone who is in a successful relationship…

                      Liked by 1 person

                    5. Ha! Well, we do disturb each other, I think, which certainly doesn’t help. And I know several couples who sleep apart and sleep better because of it. Always makes me think of those twee 60s sitcoms with twin beds.
                      I’m glad you sleep better now. Being in a relationship is not the be all and end all and many are happier without.

                      Liked by 1 person

                    6. When I accidentally got manipulated into marrying a man a few years back I came to despise him so utterly that I moved into the spare room. I didn’t say a word, and neither did he. Pretty messed up, yeah?

                      Liked by 1 person

                    7. A sad situation, though I suspect more common than we might think. Who knows what goes on between couples? I’m glad you’re free of that, Jane. Independence is better than confinement.

                      Liked by 1 person

                    8. It was a weird situation to find myself in, when all I wanted was to be alone. I didn’t like him very much even before we married, but I felt sorry for him. It’s a long story, and one I may possibly have told before, which I’m not proud of because, while it shows my kindly nature, it also illustrateds my gullability…

                      Liked by 1 person

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