Waiting for him

a clapping song…

he needs to see the doctor to get some pills
to heal his infection, to cure his ills
when he returns from the doctor’s he says to me
“they mixed up the time at the surgery.”

you know he’s well-meaning by the look on his face
he’s sweet and he’s charming, but a hopeless case

his wrist is swelling, he needs to take action
a shard of glass is causing a reaction
the case is urgent, he must get it treated
but a friend takes him captive and his plan is defeated

you know he’s well-meaning by the look on his face
he’s sweet and he’s charming, but a hopeless case

he says he’ll be back in less than half an hour
but the whole day has passed and you’re angry and sour
you can’t leave the house to go shopping for food
he arrives after dark in an apologic mood

you know he’s well-meaning by the look on his face
he’s sweet and he’s charming, but a hopeless case

he’s being thrown out of his home today
he doesn’t know why he has to go away
He said he be quick, he’d just collect his things
but I’ve been waiting for three hours in the wings

you know he’s well-meaning by the look on his face
he’s sweet and he’s charming, but a hopeless case

it drives you mad that every single day
your life goes on in this frustrating way
you can’t call him up ‘cos he doesn’t have a phone
and you can’t get away and you’re on your own

you know he’s well-meaning by the look on his face
he’s sweet and he’s charming, but a hopeless case

there’s always a reason why you can’t let him down
it’s never his fault when he’s late to come round
he needs your help as he’s just like a child
but you wish he’d grow up because it’s driving you wild

you know he’s well-meaning by the look on his face
he’s sweet and he’s charming, but a hopeless case

©Jane Paterson Basil

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11 thoughts on “Waiting for him

    1. The sweet charming man is my son. He showed up about an hour ago, and it turns out that this time, there was genuinely nothing he could have done about keeping me waiting.
      He’s getting a mobile phone tomorrow…

      Liked by 1 person

    1. I have told myself so many times that it will end soon…
      At midday today Paul was kicked out of his place, after less than 24 hours warning. He accepted full responsibility for what went wrong, but it wasn’t his fault. He’s kept away from all his associates from the past, although he’s quite lonely as a result. The only people who knew his address were close family. Laura told the whole town where he was, and dodgy folk from the past came looking for him (plus Laura). He’s not allowed visitors, and didn’t want to see them anyway. The house-staff knew he wasn’t to blame, but the house is council owned, and they wanted him out. He was told that they had to evict him because the situation could put other vulnerable tenants at risk. If I had been there I probably would have said “What, like the heroin dealer who is moving in here even as we speak?” Yes, really, there’s a known dealer in there now. What’s more, once my daughter finds out he’s there she’ll start calling for him, and they know whe’s very undesirable. I’m glad Paul is out of it for the time being…
      some of the most vulnerable people in the UK get terrible treatment. I know there are difficult issues here, but until they’re addressed our streets will be a disgrace.
      Oops! I’m ranting again.
      Paul’s staying with me for now. He’s been told that if he has nowhere else to go he can move back in!

      Liked by 1 person

        1. Under my tenancy agreement I can have a guest for up to four weeks. There’ve been a couple of incidents in this building recently, and some of the residents are in a flap about it. A lot of the tenants are elderly, lonely, and not very bright. Some of them are bored, but too lacking in imagination (or too lazy) to go out there and take on one of the many voluntary jobs available through charity and through the church. So when someone has a Christmas wreath stolen from her door, or a door handle is rattled in the middle of the night (probably by a confused tenant) they claim its happened to them, too. A few nights ago, at two in the morning, the fire service was called because a bin was on fire in the communal bin area on the second floor. Now a criminal investigation is in place. There was a smell of burning on that floor at 9 o’clock in the evening, but nobody thought to mention it! It looks as if a tenant dropped a lit cigarette in the bin. There are no fire alarms where the bins are, because the area is closed off from the main building by two fire doors.
          Now some of the tenants are suspicious of any male under the age of 40 who enters the building.
          I love this flat, and the view, but I hate everything else about it. I’m thinking of asking if I can move.

          Liked by 1 person

    1. I disguised my suffering beneath an up-beat tempo. I should have known you would see through it. You have read my poems about Laura, but you knew that, in a way, on a day-to-day level, this waiting is the hardest thing to bear. Being imprisoned in yet another way makes it harder for me to find the courage to venture out when I finally have the opportunity.
      God bless you Anton. x Jane

      Like

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