Building Narnia

I don’t often post quotes, but today I found one which appealed to me. Many people have lost all hope of a better future. Some doubt that the human race has any  future at all.

Aslan1

In his book, The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, C.S, Lewis says:

Wrong will be right, when Aslan comes in sight,
At the sound of his roar, sorrows will be no more,
When he bares his teeth, winter meets its death,
And when he shakes his mane, we shall have spring again.

I hadn’t intended to write a poem – I’m in a rush to go out – but here’s a quick one which came to me when I took a look at today’s word prompt from The Daily Post. The word is Disobey

Building Narnia

Let’s all believe in Narnia;
disobey the naysayers who speak of hierarchy, saying
that greed is a human need,
that hate is an incurable trait,
that hungry nations cannot be freed of starvation —
let Narnia eradicate those negative beliefs.
Let’s believe in Narnia,
In Narnia we will live in peace.

©Jane Paterson Basil

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42 thoughts on “Building Narnia

  1. It’s a lovely sentiment, Jane. If we all believed the same – that the world could be better – then we wouldn’t have the crap that we often have, people looking for the worst, expecting worse than that. I adored Aslan as a child, too. x

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    1. I tried to go to Narnia, but one of the front legs broke off and the wardrobe fell over. I was stuck inside, since they hadn’t got around to putting a door to Narnia in that particular wardrobe 🙂
      My mum took it in her stride – she was used to me getting stuck in bits of furniture. Dad had to saw me out of a highchair when I was about five.

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        1. Yes, he did, and mum wasn’t pleased – it was my little sister’s highchair.
          My daughter had a mishap with a wardrobe. I don’t know what she was doing, but it fell across the bedroom door. I had to get a ladder and climb in through the bedroom window to rescue her.
          Maybe it’s a genetic thing, although her children have managed to avoid felling wardrobes so far – come to think of it, the little ones don’t have a wardrobe in their bedroom. I wonder why… 🙂

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            1. Did you close the door? Your clothes must have smelled… fragrant. And you got away with it? That’s brilliant shocking!
              When one of my brothers was seven he set fire to the clothes in the wardrobe shared by my sister and I. Then he set fire to the dining table, twice. After that there were about three fire-free years, but then the shed went up in flames, twice. The second time we got there too late to save it. These incidents were all accidental. As he pointed out, it could have happened to anyone. He was also ‘unlucky’ with chairs. After he broke the fourth one dad got him a special, reinforced chair, and it was the only one he was allowed to sit on. That chair lasted over a year…

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              1. My mum was a heavy smoker herself at the time – it was her I nicked the fags from – so maybe she just didn’t smell it?
                Oh my word, your brother sounds like he was fun to have around. How can someone ‘accidentally’ set fire to so many things? I’m surprised any of you could sleep at night, wondering what would go up next.

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                1. Ah… back in the days when parents smoked in the home…
                  Like I said, it could have happened to anyone… who had a habit of holding lit matches under things to see if they’d burn. – and if you want to know where the matches came from, in our family it was my father who smoked.
                  The second shed fire was hilarious. It started in a pile of cardboard boxes. That was my favourite of all the fires. After that, life became a bit dull; Neil had finally learnt his lesson.

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  2. I’m discovering the essence of life is cyclical and the more people we have on the planet the more complex our simultaneous cycles become. A math genius could probably tell us how long it would take 8 billion people to complete their heroes journeys so we can arrive at peace. Until then, I’ve abandoned my television.

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    1. I haven’t had a TV for over three years. Do you find that if you happen to catch something fictional on someone’s television, all you can see are a lot of wooden actors playing parts? Watching TV helps you to suspend certain kinds of disbelief, but mostly it just makes you want to cry.

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      1. Yes! Watching tv makes me really sad. I started my revolt in high school when my step dad asked our neighbor to chop down his tree bc it was blocking a satellite signal. The media is a real bummer.

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        1. You have an imaginary friend called Fred? Oh… I have a friend called Serenity, and she stands in the corner of the room. The other day I was chatting to her while a friend was here (my friend was on the phone). When she came off the phone, she gave me a straight look, and said “Jane. You’re talking to a mannequin!” Serenity took the insult very well – her gaze didn’t falter from the bookcase across the room… come to think of it, she hasn’t looked away from that bookcase since I stood her in the corner… 🙂

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          1. That’s beautiful. There was 7 brothers in my dad’s family, and they would all drink at the pub together, the publican would get them all mixed up and never get their names right, so they all got called “Fred” . I suppose he’s all my lovely uncles chatting and still giving me that friendly advice

            Liked by 1 person

              1. Dad used to take me to footy, and they all would met up afterwards at the pub, I was as proud as punch and transfixed by their brotherly banter. Oh and there were three aunties as well, our family gatherings were the bestest of times, always so much laughter amongst the clan !!

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                1. I can picture it. Family laughter is the richest. Nothing in the world can match up to those perfect family times ; the unique humour which grows up between those who know each other inside out, and never fails to warm you. I have four siblings. I meet them individually, but we never all get together. I miss it – the thrilling dynamic of we five whose minds were so strongly influenced by each other as we grew. When mum died, we met to arrange the conducting of her funeral, and despite my churning grief, we laughed half of the evening away. Because we were together, we felt like children again, and it seemed as if she hadn’t really died.

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                  1. I know that feeling. I’m lucky, I’ve 2 brothers and a sister, and we get quite often. My sister’s daughter April is our common thread, she’s an opera singer and we all go along to see her performances. She’s so very talented

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                    1. How lovely! I was brought up with opera, but didn’t appreciate it fully until a few years ago.
                      We have an April in our family – she really is called April – she’s not a blood relative, but she holds a special place in the hearts of my children and me.

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                    2. I don’t know much about opera, but April i appreciate their amazing singing and I know how hard she works at it. She’s in another production in 2 weeks by a small and young opera company called BK Opera, Melbourne, maybe Google. Her name is April Foster.

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    1. She’s not – it’s for her own protection. When I lived in the woods for six months she took a long vacation in the Oxfam shop, where she looked out of the window at folks passing by, but she kept getting mauled. One time a volunteers got so enthusiastic that he pushed her over, and she banged her head on the window pane. Since then she’s preferred to be tucked away in a corner, barricaded behind the arm of a sofa, where no-one can reach her.
      I’m a little concerned – she never goes out, and she’s very pale. Thinking of getting one of those S.A.D. lights…

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        1. I’m on it, and I was wondering about past-life counselling… I think p’raps there’s something she’s still hanging on to. Sometimes she seems so far away… maybe I should write a post about her, and see what feedback I get…

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  3. I love the Narnia books, and I’ve often found them inspiring like this. Somehow it’s easy to comprehend how we should act when you think about Aslan, about Narnia. It’s inspiring and makes you want to do good. Thanks for the little lift 🙂

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